Motherhood, Marriage and Other Wild Rides

Health, Happiness and the Pursuit of Mommyhood

Chapter Two: A New voice and some dashed confidence May 7, 2010

This post chronicles the ongoing saga of one work-from-home freelance writer determined to write her first fiction novel, while raising two rambunctious preschoolers.

My second chapter is such a treat to write because I am speaking in Mike Hayden’s mind–the chapter is his narrative.

I guess that’s kind of odd: what do I know about being a man in his mid-50’s? But, I am enjoying it. And as luck would have it, I have access to a handful of experienced “car guys” in their 50s who I’ve earmarked for future interviews.

When I completed my outline for the book I thought I was so prepared–I have notes on what happens in every chapter, so when I sat down to write the actual story, I (foolishly) thought it would “write itself.”

What I quickly discovered is that if my notes suggest Treva went to get groceries, that only opens the larger can of literary worms: was it a fast trip? do the details of what she bought matter? If I mention a particular food item, why, what relevance does it have? Does she run into someone at the grocery store, who? why? How do her food choices indicate her lifestyle as a single person–does she eat well or does she prefer snacky/microwavable stuff. Sheesh! There’s no hiding from detail, and it would be inexcusable to abandon an opportunity to delve deeper into what makes my character tick.

In Chapter 2, Mike walks into his competitor’s building to complete a weekly transaction. That should be it, right? As I had him enter the building (seeing the action from his perspective in my mind’s eye)  it occurred to me all the thoughts and emotions a person has about the stuff owned by someone we envy, and I had to give his impressions, even though he’s been going there for years. This is unexpected material I never made any notes about! I’m pondering and “watching” the action play out in my imagination as much as I am typing it out; actually more imagining goes on than writing, alas.

I’ll warn you now, Mike Hayden’s no saint. But he is a good and loving man with a lot of talents who is doing his best to make choices that benefit the people he loves, although he makes some mistakes along the way.

Learn more about my novel writing process!:

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Baby’s language development starts in the womb December 5, 2009

Surprisingly, the sound of a newborn’s cry varies from hospital to birthing center around the world. Two babies born at the same moment in two different countries will cry a melodic rendition of their parents’ mother tongue, according to  a new study published by Current Biology. The findings suggest that infants begin picking up elements of what will be their first language in the womb, and certainly long before their first babble or coo.

“The dramatic finding of this study is that not only are human neonates capable of producing different cry melodies, but they prefer to produce those melody patterns that are typical for the ambient language they have heard during their fetal life, within the last trimester of gestation,” said Kathleen Wermke of the University of Würzburg in Germany. “Contrary to orthodox interpretations, these data support the importance of human infants’ crying for seeding language development.”

In many ways, this news shouldn’t come as any surprise. Early studies have already shown us:

  • Human fetuses are able to memorize sounds from the external world by the last trimester of pregnancy, with a particular sensitivity to melody contour in both music and language. (Anyone who has played a particular song or music while pregnant is delighted when baby shows recognition and preference for it!)
  • Newborns prefer their mother’s voice over other voices and perceive the emotional content of messages conveyed via intonation contours in maternal speech (a.k.a. “motherese”).
  • Earlier studies of vocal imitation had shown that infants can match vowel sounds presented to them by adult speakers, but only from 12 weeks on. That skill depends on vocal control that just isn’t physically possible much earlier, the researchers explain.

Although prenatal exposure to native language was known to influence newborns’ perception, scientists had thought that the surrounding language affected sound production much later, the researchers said. It now appears that isn’t so.

Wermke’s team recorded and analyzed the cries of 60 healthy newborns, 30 born into French-speaking families and 30 born into German-speaking families, when they were three to five days old. That analysis revealed clear differences in the shape of the newborns’ cry melodies, based on their mother tongue.

Specifically, French newborns tend to cry with a rising melody contour, whereas German newborns seem to prefer a falling melody contour in their crying. Those patterns are consistent with characteristic differences between the two languages, Wermke said.

“Imitation of melody contour, in contrast, is merely predicated upon well-coordinated respiratory-laryngeal mechanisms and is not constrained by articulatory immaturity,” the researchers write. “Newborns are probably highly motivated to imitate their mother’s behavior in order to attract her and hence to foster bonding. Because melody contour may be the only aspect of their mother’s speech that newborns are able to imitate, this might explain why we found melody contour imitation at that early age.”

  1. Mampe et al. Newborns’ Cry Melody Is Shaped by Their Native Language. Current Biology, November 5, 2009; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.09.064